For The Record…

I do believe that unfortunately not as many black people in modern day America are interested in dance music, but perhaps they could grow an interest by seeing, hearing, and learning about other people who look like them that are involved.

Hello!

I just want to remind folks that being “pro something” doesn’t mean you’re “anti the opposite”. I had someone message me stating that this blog, Underground and Black is “divisive” because one of the goals is to showcase people of color involved in dance music. He backed down once I explained my reasoning in detail, yet I’m left feeling like this happens far too often; the questioning of minority groups wanting to celebrate their culture/contributions. Historically, many black art forms have been subjected to white washing, and this, in my opinion, stems from different factors. I do believe that unfortunately not as many black people in modern day America are interested in dance music, but perhaps they could grow an interest by seeing, hearing, and learning about other people who look like them that are involved. As of late, there seems to be a resurgence of black millennial aged people who are taking an interest in this music, and I merely want to be apart of the process of keeping the momentum going (through DJing, my blog, and any other way I can.) Of course I think everyone should be celebrated, but with that being said, it’s often us people of color who are not celebrated when we are more than deserving.

I don’t know how effective this journey will be, but if I can simply educate and inform a few people about something that I’m passionate about, I’m content. In the year that I’ve been DJing publicly (and blogging) I’ve had people of all races tell me how they are inspired and extremely supportive of what I’m doing, and it makes me feel like I’m making somewhat of a difference. To the argument “the music is for everyone”, I get that, but let’s not forget those who paved the way, and at the same time let’s celebrate those who want to continue the legacy of black people in underground dance music. To me, this is bigger than being a “DJ” or a “Blogger”…this is some historical shit, and I want to be apart of it. Not for notoriety, but because it’s something that I care about immensely.

I was born in Detroit in 1985, the same exact time and place that Techno was born, and was listening to a lot of this music as a kid before I even truly knew what it was. Once I figured it all out (especially the black involvement) it amazed me, inspired me, and legit molded me into who I am today, so if you have a problem with me wanting to celebrate black people in dance music, then perhaps you are the one that’s divisive. We all have the platform that is the internet, and it’s up to you what you choose what to do with it, but please don’t shame me for wanting to share my experiences as black woman as well as celebrate those who are often overlooked. I’m blessed to be in the position that I’m in today, and I want to make a vocal and visible difference. I realize there will always be those people who feel “offended” or “left out”, and that’s fine with me, this isn’t about YOU. Stand or something or fall for anything. #straightup

Author: ashlauryn

ASH LAURYN is a DJ and party promoter hailing from Detroit, MI who is currently based in Atlanta, GA. ASH specializes in underground dance music, and says most of her influence stems from her roots back home in Detroit. As an active member of the dance music community for over a decade, ASH hosts her own event series called ORBIT, and is currently a resident DJ with Atlanta’s Deep South crew.